Any legal +.830 COR Drivers?

Was reading an article about Long Driving and it says that in tournaments some players will bring clubs that have higher than the .830 COR but are still legal because the rules were different when they were made. I'm assuming this is kind of like the Ping square grooves situation, but I did a search on here without any luck. That through up a major red flag because driver topics concerning extra distance a dime a dozen on here.
Any information on this? What drivers might they be talking about?
Answers:
I am not sure what you read, but anything over .83 is illegal, no matter when it was made. I guess it would be possible to find a driver slightly over .83, but that would only be due to manufacturing tolerances. Technically speaking though, anything over .83 is illegal and there is no grandfather clause.
Edit: I just realized that you were talking about LD comps. It is possible that some LD circuit has different rules, but as far as the USGA and the R&A, anything over .83 is banned, period.
Answers:
The only way I can see this happening is that there is a threshold or a standard deviation that the face can have. I am not sure what that number is. .830 is the max but there is a threshold where they can fractionally go over. When a club is tested they have to test 100 of those clubs. If any one of the 100 clubs go over the threshold then the entire line is considered non-conforming. However if a few go over .830 but stay within the threshold then they are considered conforming.
I believe the reason for the limits and thresholds was based off of the old Taylor Made 500 series. When some of the models of the 580 were tested as non-conforming which was during the time the .830 limit was set. They claimed that it was impossible to make every single club exactly at the limit and some may unintentionally slip over by a hair. That hair of manufacturing tolerance became the threshold. I don't think that the tolerance is significant however, because Nike and Callaway both have had issues recently staying within the range. I have a feeling that they were trying to push the limit of the threshold and imperfections in manufacturing cause a few clubs to go over. Thus they were deemed non-conforming.
There could be the possibility that some of those that go over but stay within the theshold, are held for certain people. ie. Long drivers or whomever.
Answers:
This is the link I was reading and #5 says Driver heads manufactured prior to 1999 are exempt from the requirement of this Condition. And the link isn't from long drivers it's from usga.
I guess I was wondering if anyone actually uses some of those clubs to gain some sort of advantage. But I guess technology has come such a long way that it would be impossible that a club from 1998 would out perform a club from 2008.
Answers:
In 2002,TaylorMade brought out the original models of the R500 Series, (R510, R540, R580) in the USA. TM touted the new COR limit of .860 (more spring to the face), that would soon be adopted by the USGA. It was risk to announce the new COR standard of course, but
TM expected the USGA to adopt the same .860 COR rules standard already adopted by the R&A, (Royal and Ancient), which govern the rules of golf for all countries except the USA.
Unfortunately, TM's decision to rush .860 COR drivers to market backfired on them bigtime. Much to TM's surprise, the USGA decided NOT to adopt the .860 COR (R&A standard). Furthermore, the USGA deemed any driver with a COR higher than .830 would be considered non-conforming and illegal for tournament play in the United States. Obviously the USGA's suprising decision created a financial disaster for TM in the USA. TM was forced to offer an exchange program to replace the non-confoming drivers for any customer unhappy with their purchase in the USA. Although not everyone wanted a replacement driver with a face "less hot", there were also many TM customers who felt it would be "cheating" to use an "illegal" model whether or not they played in USGA sanctioned events.
Soon thereafter, the R&A decided to rollback the COR standard to .830 as well rather than having a different standard than the USGA. This was essentially reversed their earlier decision to adopt the .860 COR standard. However, the R&A also decided a "grace period" was necessary so the rollback to .830 COR would not be effective until 2008. This meant that up until this year, non-conforming .860 R500's were still legal for tournament play outside the USA, (where R&A rules apply). Only this year are these hot-faced heads actually illegal for tournament play under R&A rules.
By the way, you can still purchase brand new .860 COR non-conforming R500 "hot-faced"drivers on ebay. In fact, these non-conforming drivers seem to be selling quite well there. I noted the other day that several 7.5* R510's had sold for over $100 there. I would call that a premium price for a 2002 vintage driver, but then again the 330cc R510 is a very solid driver and many feel the .860 COR hot face makes it as long as anything you can buy today.
Answers:
This is the link I was reading and #5 says Driver heads manufactured prior to 1999 are exempt from the requirement of this Condition. And the link isn't from long drivers it's from usga.
I guess I was wondering if anyone actually uses some of those clubs to gain some sort of advantage. But I guess technology has come such a long way that it would be impossible that a club from 1998 would out perform a club from 2008.
I guess you are right. However, I doubt you would find a driver made before '99 that had a COR of .83, much less .86. At the time driver faces were much thicker and the trampoline effect wasn't really in use yet, AFAIK.
BTW, the difference between .83 and .86 is really not much. At best,you might gain 2 or 3 yards, 5 at the very, very most and that is w/ a LD type swing speed.